Tuesday, 9 October 2012

World Mental Health Day 10 October 2012

World Mental Health Day
10 October 2012
This year the theme for World Mental Health Day is
“Depression: A Global Crisis”.

Depression affects more than 350 million people of all ages, in all communities, and is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease.

What causes depression?
There are many factors that can contribute to the development of depression. There might be underlying biochemical or psychological issues that predispose an individual to depression. There might be a trigger such as a stressful event, a bereavement, loss of a job, or break up of a relationship.

There are a number of nutritional imbalances that can make you prone to depression like deficiency of Essential fats, Chromium, Vitamin D, low levels of Serotonin the feel good hormone, imbalance of blood sugar, food intolerances….we will check on all this in the coming week…wherein I will post questionnaire for u all to check up whether ARE YOU DEPRESSED?, YOUR FOOD SENSITIVITY CHECK LIST  and many more…but today being the world mental health day I would like to talk on nutrition in depression

 Is there really a nutritional connection to depression? Considering that there is a nutritional connection to nearly every dis-ease in the books, the odds are on:

Here are 10 tips which can be of help you or a loved one is recovering from clinical depression.

1. Eat a Diet High in Nutrients

Nutrients in foods support the body's repair, growth, and wellness. Nutrients we all need include vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, protein, and even a small amount of fat. A deficiency in any of these nutrients lead to our bodies not working at full capacity -- and can even cause illness.

2. Fill Your Plate With Essential Antioxidants

Damaging molecules called free radicals are produced in our bodies during normal body functions -- and these free radicals contribute to aging and dysfunction. Antioxidants such as beta-carotene and vitamins C and E combat the effects of free radicals. Antioxidants have been shown to tie up these free radicals and take away their destructive power.
 
Studies show that the brain is particularly at risk for free radical damage. Although there's no way to stop free radicals completely, we can reduce their destructive effect on the body by eating foods rich in antioxidants as part of a healthy diet, including:
  • Sources of beta-carotene: apricots, broccoli, cantaloupe, carrots, collards, peaches, pumpkin, spinach, sweet potato. 
  • Sources of vitamin C: blueberries, broccoli, grapefruit, kiwi, oranges, peppers, potatoes, strawberries, tomato. 
  • Sources of vitamin E: margarine, nuts and seeds, vegetable oils, wheat germ. 
 3. Eat "Smart" Carbs for a Calming Effect

Don't shun carbs -- just make smart choices. Limit sugary foods and opt for smart carbs, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes, which all contribute healthy carbs as well as fiber.

Also do pay attention to mineral chromium which is vital for keeping your blood sugar level stable because insulin, which clears glucose from the blood, can't work properly without it. In fact it turns out that just supplying proper levels of chromium to people with atypical depression can make a big difference.

4. Eat Protein-Rich Foods to Boost Alertness

Foods rich in protein, like turkey, tuna, or chicken, are rich in an amino acid called tyrosine. Tyrosine may help boost levels of the brain chemicals dopamine and norepinephrine. This boost helps you feel alert and makes it easier to concentrate. 

Also it is important to consider tryptophan, a large amino that converts to serotonin in the brain. "85% of our serotonin is created in the gut." Serotonin is considered a "brain" chemical. Serotonin, whether created in the gut or in the brain, begins on the end of your fork.  Tryptophan works best when consumed in conjunction with a small bit of carbohydrate, such as a scoop of brown rice, a handful of nuts, or a few tablespoons of legumes. These complex carbohydrates are essential to helping your brain properly process the tryptophan in protein.

Try to include a protein source in your diet several times a day, especially when you need to clear your mind and boost your energy.

Good sources of healthy proteins: beans and peas, lean beef, low-fat cheese, fish, milk, poultry, soy products, yogurt.

5. Get Plenty of Vitamin D

Known as the ‘sunshine vitamin’, around 90% of our vitamin D is synthesised in our skin by the action of sunlight A 2010 national study found that the likelihood of having depression is higher in people with deficiency in vitamin D compared to people who are sufficient in vitamin D. Vitamin D receptors are found in the brain. Researchers, though, are unsure how much vitamin D is ideal. 
6. Select Selenium-Rich Foods

Selenium is a mineral that is essential to good health. Studies have reported an association between low selenium intake and poorer moods, although evidence isn't conclusive on whether supplementation can help.
It is possible to take in too much selenium so that it becomes toxic. But this is unlikely if you're getting it from foods rather than supplements, and it can't hurt to make sure you're eating foods that help you meet the recommended intake for selenium, which is 55 micrograms a day for adults. The good news is that foods rich in selenium are foods we should be eating anyway. They include:
  • Beans and legumes
  • Lean meat (lean pork and beef, skinless chicken and turkey)
  • Low-fat dairy products
  • Nuts and seeds (particularly brazil nuts)
  • Seafood (oysters, clams, sardines, crab, saltwater fish, and freshwater fish)
  • Whole grains (whole-grain pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, etc.)
7. Include Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Your Diet
 
Recently, scientists have revealed that a deficit of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with depression. In one study, researchers determined that societies that eat a small amount of omega-3 fatty acids have a higher prevalence of major depressive disorder than societies that get ample omega-3 fatty acids. 

Sources of omega-3 fatty acids: fatty fish (anchovy, mackerel, salmon, sardines, shad, and tuna), flaxseed, and nuts.
  
8. Watch Your Lifestyle Habits


Many people who are depressed also have problems with alcohol and/or drugs. Not only can alcohol and drugs interfere with mood, sleep, and motivation, they can also affect the effectiveness of your depression medications. 

These substances temporarily give you a lift, but actually deplete and blunt valuable hormones in the long run. Avoid the stimulant cycle.

In addition, drinks and foods containing caffeine can trigger anxiety and make it difficult to sleep at night. Cutting out caffeine or stopping caffeine after noon each day can also help you get a better night's sleep.



9. Stay at a Healthy Weight

Findings show a link between obesity and depression, indicating that people who are obese may be more likely to become depressed. In addition, according to this study, people who are depressed are more likely to become obese. 

Researchers believe the link between obesity and depression may result from physiological changes that occur in the immune system and hormones with depression. If you have a weight problem, talk with your doctor about healthy ways to manage it with diet and exercise.
 
10. Exercise to feel  good.
Exercise is a natural stimulator of many important “mood” hormones, including serotonin and dopamine. Don’t think of exercise as a chore to lose weight or prevent heart disease “someday”. Realize that 15 or 20 minutes of exercise every day will naturally release these feel-good hormones that are so vital to feeling happy and calm.Exercise is about feeling good, not just looking good. Even just a simple WALK will do.

However weak or strong the effects of nutrition are on depression, providing the body with the nutrition it needs is a positive step individuals can take toward combating their condition. With adequate nutrition, we are all better prepared to face the challenges of the day.



1 comment:

  1. nice blog
    thanks for sharing information.
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